5 Lessons Physical Therapists can Learn from Bruce Lee

I wrote a guest post for Strive Labs. Check it out:

“Bruce Lee is one of my personal heroes. While there are many reasons I admire him, I find his philosophical approach to everything the most salient and magnetic feature of admiration. We can learn numerous lessons from his life. Here are 5 lessons that apply to Physical Therapists as individuals, and Physical Therapy as a profession.”

Continue reading…

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LeeAnne K-G: Top 5 Life lessons Learned So Far

I recently asked LeeAnne Ketchen-Gullett, ATC, MS about her “Top 5 Life Lessons So Far” and she was generous to respond with this fantastic guest blog. It is a worthwhile read that I will definitely re-visit periodically. In case you haven’t already met LeeAnne, you can find her on twitter @LKetchen14ATC (not only is she a Certified Athletic Trainer, but she’s also a Full-time Volunteer!). Enjoy the read and I hope you get as much out of it as I do.


There is Value to Each Individual You Meet

Meeting new people is one of my favorite things whether it is on a plane, conference, sports event,  work related or standing in a line. I take it as an opportunity to understand people and myself. I am not saying I “like” or have great experiences with every person I meet but I do take something away from each individual and interaction and carry it with me. During good or bad interaction I learn how to listen, engage in intellectual conversation, know when not to speak, and use of body language.  I’ll admit, often I have learned communicating the hard way but its valuable the next time a similar situation presents itself. I have met amazing people in unique circumstances and they have made an impact on me forever and may or may not even realize it. The world is big and full of incredible people. I would like to meet as many people as possible for the experience and to take a little bit of them with me. I find great importance to live in the moment and take the opportunity for person interaction because everyone has their own story and we can all learn from one another. That being said- even the smallest interactions can play a role, never underestimate the impact you can have on someone else’s life.

The world owes you nothing

Just because bad things happen doesn’t mean something good will happen to make up for it. Just because you work your tail off may not mean you get the job you want or put you necessarily where you want to be. I have learned to not “expect” much in return for what I do or accomplish. It is about changing your mindset and attitude. I work and am there for people because I love to do it and the reward is it makes me feel good. It is about being a good person and waking up with a positive attitude. I find that if I can do that then it will trump many things. It is important to focus on what we do have control over and the goals we set for our self. It is not okay to expect rewards for all things we do because we feel that we “deserve” it. It doesn’t always workout that way and we must carry on, work hard, and move forward. In life nothing is ever guaranteed, so everyday create your own luck and opportunity.

You cant wait for the perfect opportunity- Take a chance and step out of your comfort zone

Looking back I feel like I missed out on some opportunities because I was waiting for the perfect “moment” or “timing” where everything would fall together nicely and work out perfectly. What I’ve learned: rarely does this happen. I discovered that I wasn’t good at having a plan. I just ruined plans. However, I was better at planning and found it to be more efficient in accomplishments. If you take a chance and go with a positive attitude, it WILL work out and you will find success. I used to be scared that something bad would happen and it would mean a big set back in my life. I was wrong. It was in the moments where I didn’t have a plan, that potential opportunities opened up, when I dove in fully. I had no idea how things were going to turn out or where it was going to lead me, but it is in those moments I learned the most. Being in uncomfortable situations uncovered feelings I didn’t know I had and didn’t know I could handle. It’s about discovering parts of yourself you didn’t know existed and using them for future situations. This has happened to me on more than one occasion and I couldn’t be more grateful for chances that I have taken on a whim. It has lead me down a strong path of meeting amazing people and being put in tough situations that has built me as a person and professional.

Show that you care, be present

I believe that we are all connected somehow and this kind of goes hand in hand with my lesson number one.  I have found that building trust, being passionate, being considerate and caring can be the most rewarding thing one can do.  I didn’t understand this until I started getting e-mails and cards from people expressing gratitude about how important it was to them that I gave them time, listened to them, and show that I care. I truly value each person I work and interact with. It has to do with being a good person, doing the right thing, and being there for someone because you want to be genuine, to be their listening ear, and show concern. When I get feedback (cards and emails), I realize how much their feedback affects me, and I then understand the impact I may have on others. That is what feels amazing.  I think it is so important to not only show that your care, but when given the opportunity, let others know that you appreciate them. Even if it is as simple as a solid “thank you”, I know in my industry it can go a long way.

“I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” ― Maya Angelou

Intuition and instinct can go a long way.

I think it is important to be in tune with our instinctive nature and follow the path it leads us down. Intuition and instinct isn’t measurable, it’s a feeling and belief based around experiences and facts that have been in our life. These experiences turn into our ability to problem solve and respond to situations for success. I suppose I can take the top four life lessons already mentioned and say intuition and instinct play a huge role in all of them. I would like to think growing up I have had a solid foundation built around strong morals and beliefs. As I get older and go through new experiences and challenges, I find self-talk and reflection to be one of the most beneficial parts to my day. Trusting my intuitive nature and making quick decisions has led me down an amazing journey.

Accept no ones definition of yourself because no one knows you better than you do. Society, parents, teachers may have an image about how you need to be and how to live your life in order to be successful. Fact of the matter is that everyone reacts and responds to situations differently. Life is here for us to create and define our self as a person, how we want to be and what path we choose. It is important to spend life on your own terms and what you believe in.  This is created by the choices we make and not the choices people think we should make. Be you, listen to yourself, and create yourself based on your intuition and instinct. I look forward to each morning, excited to create new opportunity and another day to build a better version of myself.

Connect with LeeAnne Ketchen-Gullett, ATC, MS on Twitter.

And find me @Cinema_Air

How to Fail Miserably

Charles T. Munger’s 1986 Harvard School commencement speech was inspired by a prior commencement speech given by Johnny Carson. Carson’s sarcastic speech provided a blueprint for guaranteed misery in life. Carson’s prescription included:

  1. Ingesting chemicals in an effort to alter mood or prescription
  2. Envy, and
  3. Resentment

Munger commented on Carson’s recommendations, and then added four more prescriptions:

  1. Be unreliable
  2. Learn everything you possibly can from your own personal experience, minimizing what you learn vicariously
  3. Go down and stay down when you get your first, second, or third severe reverse in the battle of life
  4. Ignore the advice of a rustic who said: “I wish I knew where I was going to die, and the I’d never go there.”

Following suit, let’s consider some prerequisites for guaranteed failure and professional burnout. I will skew this towards the Physical Therapist, but can be applied to any profession.

First, resist change. Graduated with a DPT, you are now equipped with enough moxy to delegate patient care. Still drenched in research and free from the wisdom of an evaluated experience, begin entertaining the thought that you are now the international filter of ideal patient care and physical therapy treatment. Continuing education courses are merely confirmation of what you already know; a checkmark to maintain your licensure. This applies to you too; yes you, the seasoned physical therapist. Don’t risk professional evolution by assimilating new and relevant research, or by learning from the very individual you are attempting to treat. A surefire recipe for failure is holding onto the past; hold fast.

Second, fly solo. If history is any guide, then you must not risk attaining a rewarding career by collaborating with those around you. Do not, by any means, aid or abet the very organization that represents and preserves your profession. Also, related to change avoidance (see above), beware social collaboration. It would serve you well to abstain from the wisdom distilled from the following quote by Stephen Landauer:

In Plato’s Republic, guards were taught by poets. Views contrary to your own are always helpful, as sometimes you will see truth in them and effect change, and, if not, you will be stress-testing and ultimately strengthening your own convictions.

Your desire for failure may hit a roadblock as closely held ideas and perspectives could be challenged, and errors exposed. Remain steadfast in your resilience for professional atrophy; stay inside.

And, finally, stop focusing on solutions. Given the dedication to failure, one must avoid solutions; instead, spin the wheel of status quo by repeatedly underlining problems without suggesting creative alternatives. Maintain a purely subjective point of view, avoid objectivity. In fact, it might be easier to simply beat the drums of your favorite dogma. Becoming an agent of change could put you at risk of developing a meaningful and impactful career. Embrace cognitive ossification; stop exploring.

Ladies and Gentlemen, Boys and Girls, keep staring at your feet.

Find me on Twitter @Cinema_Air

Sources:                                                                                                                      “Seeking Wisdom: From Darwin to Munger” by Peter Bevelin                                                “Maximize Your Potential” edited by Jocelyn K Glei

“Regret Minimization Framework” by Jeff Bezos

Making major life-altering decisions is inherently daunting. Jeff Bezos, Amazon’s founder and CEO, provides a brilliant filter that simplifies the decision – A “Regret Minimization Framework.” (video at bottom of post) This is simply beautiful:

I went to my boss and said to him, “You know, I’m going to go do this crazy thing and I’m going to start this company selling books online.” This was something that I had already been talking to him about in a sort of more general context, but then he said, “Let’s go on a walk.” And, we went on a two hour walk in Central Park in New York City and the conclusion of that was this. He said, “You know, this actually sounds like a really good idea to me, but it sounds like it would be a better idea for somebody who didn’t already have a good job.” He convinced me to think about it for 48 hours before making a final decision.

So, I went away and was trying to find the right framework in which to make that kind of big decision. I had already talked to my wife about this, and she was very supportive and said, “Look, you know you can count me in 100 percent, whatever you want to do.” It’s true she had married this fairly stable guy in a stable career path, and now he wanted to go do this crazy thing, but she was 100 percent supportive. So, it really was a decision that I had to make for myself, and the framework I found which made the decision incredibly easy was what I called — which only a nerd would call — a “regret minimization framework.”

So, I wanted to project myself forward to age 80 and say, “Okay, now I’m looking back on my life. I want to have minimized the number of regrets I have.” I knew that when I was 80 I was not going to regret having tried this. I was not going to regret trying to participate in this thing called the Internet that I thought was going to be a really big deal. I knew that if I failed I wouldn’t regret that, but I knew the one thing I might regret is not ever having tried. I knew that that would haunt me every day, and so, when I thought about it that way it was an incredibly easy decision. And, I think that’s very good.

If you can project yourself out to age 80 and sort of think, “What will I think at that time?” it gets you away from some of the daily pieces of confusion. You know, I left this Wall Street firm in the middle of the year. When you do that, you walk away from your annual bonus. That’s the kind of thing that in the short-term can confuse you, but if you think about the long-term then you can really make good life decisions that you won’t regret later.

Sources: Academy of Acheivement and Bijan Sabet

Find me on Twitter @Cinema_Air

Letter to DPT Graduates

Dear DPT Graduates,

Congratulations! Your dedication and achievement is remarkable. Welcome to the Profession.

As you are aware, your new profession provides many avenues of growth through a myriad of specialties and environments. You will encounter the agreeable and challenging; and if you’re lucky, the unbelievable or unthinkable. Therein lies your opportunity.

Our world of political and financial uncertainty births opportunity. Change is the only constant. Move beyond the tribalism plaguing our profession; collaborate your way to success. While the pendulum swings relentlessly to the extremes, beware of boxing in your future by rigidly defining yourself. Look to these extremes as your opportunity to leap-frog toward your goals. As Rahm Emmanual said, “You don’t ever want a crisis to go to waste; it’s an opportunity to do important things that you would otherwise avoid.” Be open to novel possibilities. Avoid ideology; never stop learning. Stand on the shoulders of those before you.

One last piece of professional advice: DPT Graduate Do Not Outsource Thyself. Be indispensable. Keep this in mind as you make decisions regarding your new profession. You graduate with a strong foundation deserving of meaningful progression; anything less would be a disservice. In keeping with this advice, it is best to discover obstacles before you trip over them. As John Paulson said, “Watch the downside, the upside will take care of itself. ”

Congratulations. Welcome to your new profession. Be daringly great,

Cinema

Find me on Twitter @Cinema_Air