Fund #GetPT1st Now!

Many of us have enjoyed the benefits of the efforts of Sean Hagey in coalescing the profession behind #GetPT1st. Some folks were a bit skeptical about it in the beginning, but their skepticism faded as #GetPT1st stayed focused on its message and continued to deliver content that you, I, and our fellow PT’s have shared with colleagues, friends, and family.

Here’s the crazy part: Sean managed to rally the profession while working his regular job and devoting extra hours (and finances!) to the #GetPT1st campaign…his “pet project”!

Let’s rally behind Sean. Check out his video and donate by clicking here.

Who could have predicted #GetPT1st 5 years ago? Certainly not me. #GetPT1st turned into a powerful medium to spread the value and power of physical therapy, and I strongly encourage you to take part in the movement.

What’s not to like? Do it for your patients, do it for your profession. This might just be the most fulfilling money you’ve spent is some time.

Join me in supporting Sean by funding #GetPT1st here.

 

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Mea Culpa

2016 exploded onto the scene, and there’s no looking back. A couple milestones await for me in the next few months. One of them is a Physical Therapy Class Reunion. No, I’m not going to mention how many years have passed, but let it suffice to know that I’m more excited about our profession now than ever.

Emotion and Experience were vital components to my growth as a Physical Therapist thus far, and they will likely continue to play their vital role for the foreseeable future. Emotion and Experience are also vital components of our growth as human beings. Perhaps the Environment we grew though, and will continue to grow in/through, is an equally (or more) significant determinant in our Emotional and Experiential growth.

Either way, here are some thoughts that are crossing my mind in this period of critical change. I hope you find them as useful as I do.


Don’t shy away from asking yourself “What the fuck am I doing with myself?” Don’t shy away because there’s no wrong answer to this question. The reality is a very small percentage of you (no, it’s probably not you) are following a life-plan penciled perfectly in high school. Asking yourself this question is more about self-correcting than proselytizing. It’s a series of continual adjustments based on your long term vision.

Entertain yourself. It’s more fun than you can imagine.

Don’t shy away from intentionally disappointing someone if you know that there’s a high probability that the bread is about to fall jelly-side down. This doesn’t mean you have to be memorably offensive. Saying “no” effectively without crushing relationships is a skill worth developing.

Don’t worry about what people think of you. This simple life-hack will free your mind more than almost anything. Also, it clears your lens on life by allowing you to see how clever or transparent people truly are. You’ll be tempted to gain and keep the recognition of those smart people you think you identify with. The reality is you’re probably fooling yourself into building a self-image that is ultimately painfully unsustainable.

If you aren’t any closer to your desired lifestyle this year than the last year, then hop on that horse and make it happen. It’s incredible how 1 year turns into 3, and before you know it you’ve been treading water…at best. This simple fact will continue to boggle your mind in real-time and in retrospect. Some smart guy once said: “The best way to predict the future is to invent it.” He might be right.

Health is wealth. Yup, the oldies were right. Health truly is wealth.

Consider the impact of all the non-renewable resources in your life. “Time” deserves to be very high on that list.

One of the few constants other than Time is Change. Don’t be afraid to change. It’s going to happen anyway, so why not take the wheel rather than handing it off to people you don’t really know – employers and their management teams, especially their management teams. Don’t be afraid to take the wheel and change lanes.

Sleep. Sleep because feeling well-rested is a glorious feeling.

Don’t “grow up”. I’m still not sure what that term means, but avoid it as much as possible. The “grown-ups” tell me it’s overrated.

Be nice. The world is getting smaller every year…which means Karmic paybacks happen quicker and/or with greater intensity today than yesterday.

Simplicity is priceless. If you can’t explain what you’re doing to a 12 year old, then you’re carrying around unnecessary baggage. Lighten the load, and clear your plate down to the bare essentials. At the very least, simplicity makes it easier to smile.

You can’t outrun your fork.

And, if you’re riddled with indecision, then apply the Regret Minimization Framework.

As many of you are well aware, I enjoy reading books. Early March 2016 saw the first edition of my Quarterly Readings Newsletter. It is an update on some of the more interesting reads of the 3 months preceding publication of the email Newsletter. Email me with “I love to read!” in the subject line, and I will add you to the email list. 

How to Study for Physio Specialty Certification Exams

Having been through 2 certifications (so far) in my career, I thought I should provide current & aspiring certification candidates a birds-eye peek into my study routine. Each section listed below can become more involved based on your learning habits and learning strengths. So, if you have thoughts, questions, or opinions on any of them, then feel free to leave a comment to help make this a more productive post.

Certification can be quite stressful and overwhelming. You have to give it everything you’ve got. Might as well use all 5 senses! Here we go…

See.

  1. If you can rent DVD’s or stream videos of the course, then definitely do so. You’ll become more familiar with the techniques and clinical reasoning process by watching the instructors. Not only will this help you didactically, but it’ll also get you used to seeing the teachers who may be testing you. This way you’ll be (relatively) less intimidated when you’re in the testing room with him/her. Visual familiarity calmed my nerves by giving me a read on their facial responses and general movement patterns. Not only did this help me respond better during testing, but it also allowed me to get a sense of their psychological atmosphere, which cued me to choreograph my performance to fit their disposition at that particular period of time.
  2. Another way to utilize your visual input to sharpen your skills is by watching your study partners. For this reason alone, it might be worth your while to work in a group of 3. Another option is to use mirrors. Since one major way we learn is by watching others, it is important to choose an appropriate partner for visual feedback.
  3. Diagram everything as much as you can. I’m a visual learner, so this helped me immensely. Sequences, lists, groupings… even the page of contents.

Hear.

  1. Audio record the DVD’s or streaming video. Put them onto your iPod or smartphone so that you can access them quickly during your commute or review it audibly before bed.
  2. Record yourself reading or reasoning through the manual. This would be a much more personalized means of audibly reviewing material.
  3. Verbalize the material by yourself before talking it out with your study partners.

Smell & Taste.

  1. Build routines into your study. A certain coffee or tea. The smell of a location: bookstore, study partner’s home, etc. Then, imagine or recollect the same smells or tastes as you’re reviewing materials independently or with a study buddy. Make a joke about it. Connect it to whichever material you’re having a tough time recalling. The more sensory neurotags you create around your study content, the better the odds of performing under pressure.
  2. Have some dry finger foods while you study. I have no idea why this made the study process more productive, but I covered more ground and made sharper connections while my hands kept popping food into my face.

Touch.

  1. Kinesthetic awareness. If your certification includes a hands-on portion, then you should develop an awareness of what it feels like when a technique is done correctly and incorrectly. Feel for the sense of effectiveness both as the tester and tester’s partner. Be able to tell when your partner is on the right track when s/he is working with you. Provide constructive and precise feedback. The more precise your feedback, the sharper you develop your kinesthetic awareness. This in-turn can guide your performance during testing.
  2. Work on as wide range of people as possible. If possible, work on either the instructor and/or others who have recently passed the certification. Also, have them work on you so that you get a physical sense of how it feels when done right, and how they use their body/hands/etc.
  3. Re-write the manual in your own words. I know. It’s a bit strange to put this under “touch,” but the physical act of writing somehow helped coalesce the material better for me. I tried typing, but it wasn’t as effective. Also, writing allows you to draw arrows, smiley faces, or whatever else you’re into, to make connections and highlight important sections requiring further attention.

As, mentioned earlier, you can make this a more productive discussion by leaving helpful advice in the comments section.

Good Luck!

Cinema

P.S. – As many of you are well aware, I enjoy reading books. Early March 2016 saw the first edition of my Quarterly Readings Newsletter. It is an update on some of the more interesting reads of the 3 months preceding publication of the email Newsletter. Email me with “I love to read!” in the subject line, and I will add you to the email list.