Hindsight Wisdom! Special Post for #solvePT 02/24/15

Tonight’s #solvePT discussion revolved around the following question:

It just so happens that I’ve asked a similar question repeatedly over the last year in my interviews. I highly recommend that you check out the interviews. There are TONS of wisdom and lessons to learn from these shared stories and experiences. 

The question I asked was some variation of: “Imagine you’ve travelled back in time right after your graduation from PT school and are face-to-face with yourself. What advice would you give to your younger self?” I’ve listed the responses below.

Enjoy this special post for #solvePT!


Dr. Nick Nordvedt: LEARN and find a mentor. PT students and new grads that I meet are frequently surprised by the vast amount of knowledge still to learn after graduation. We graduate as generalists, but must find our practice niche after graduation. I think the best way to do this is through taking advantage of every learning opportunity available and find a great mentor that shares core practice values with you.

DR. MONIQUE CARUTH: LOL, shouting out loud to my young self…”You do not know it all!!!!”,  I would tell myself to welcome constructive criticism because those that offer it they see potential in you and care about you to take the time to invest in sharing ways and means for you to better achieve your goals. Those that don’t care won’t waste time even offering anything good or bad. Don’t beat yourself up about getting a B on an exam, no one cares what your grades are when you leave PT school as long as you pass your boards. Take a few business electives. Chat with managerial students. Meet and sustain relationships with great mentors. Engage in social media. Advocate more for our profession.

Dr. Ben Fung: Get involved in legislative issues – licensure defines practice patterns. PERIOD. If you want to truly be regarded as a primary care, provider of choice for neuromusculoskeletal impairments – one must be first licensed to do so to effectively penetrate the market.

DR. ERICA MELOE: That’s an interesting question because I gave up a financially rewarding career to go back to school. I would advise the student to pay attention to the trends in healthcare. When I graduated PT school, it was during a time when no one was hiring! The Balanced Budget Act was in full swing and the Medicare Cap was just instituted. There is no way as a PT Student you could have prepared yourself for that, realistically. I would also have advised myself to seek a mentor out, someone who was already established as a PT. Mentors are so important for both personal and professional development. And I think as a student in a field that was undergoing so much change, it would have been nice to see the field from a different perspective.

When I was at Stern in my last year of business school, NYU set up “informational Interviews” with alumni and they endeavored to match you both with regards to industry. These were very helpful in the sense that it opened my eyes to the opportunities in my field. When I was in PT school, I did not have that opportunity. I would urge students to request this if their programs were not offering it already.

DR. DAVID BROWDER:  Daniel Pink, in his book ‘Drive’ lists three things that drive intrinsic motivation.  1) Autonomy, 2) Mastery and 3) Purpose.  My advice is to seek opportunities to work in an organization where the purpose of physical therapy is embedded into the culture, and where they can gain mastery in the practice of physical therapy.  For those so inclined seek out mentors who can help develop management and leadership skills.  I believe that specialization is an excellent route to this.  Autonomy is more difficult and can definitely be found professionally, but for those that have the ambition and determination to build their own practice – I think there is no better place than private practice physical therapy to find the confluence of these three things.

Dr. Sandy Hilton: Be bold and take chances. You will need to be persistent to get what you want, do it with grace and kindness, but do it.

And publish your masters thesis, because you were right.

Dr. Erson Religioso III: Clinically: You don’t know it all, and for God’s sake, stop beating on people to make them move better!

Personally: Start working on your symmetry and stop with the huge pounding overstrides so you don’t have to quit running due to knee pain. Also, invest in something called google.

Jerry Durham:I would beat the following statements into my Younger head….

-Believe in yourself, your ideas and what you bring.

-Understand that YOU being YOU is the most Valuable thing you can do (Fuck others who say dont be YOU)

-Present SOLUTIONS not just COMPLAINTS

-Don’t be afraid NOT to be the smartest guy in the room…You can learn from Everybody

-Find a Business Mentor TODAY (this woulda helped on multiple fronts, not just starting my biz)

-Set up a financial plan and follow it..

-Your parents are right!!…(almost all of the time).

All of those played a huge role in my personal and professional development.  A couple of those came way later than others.  If those were beat into my head 20 years ago, my learning curve would have been far shorter!

(I would also mention to hold that Apple stock I bought at $14 a share…no joke.  But thats for another day)

TODD HARGROVE: Invest in Google and Amazon. Chicken wing consumption needs to come down.

I don’t regret going to law school at all, it was one of the best times of my life. But I do regret not getting started with my current career a little earlier. Is there a difference between these two things? It feels that way to me. If I had gotten started with this career earlier maybe I would have been more involved in strength and conditioning and sports performance.

BRUCE WILK: It was 1980 and it was my senior year of physical therapy school.  I was disappointed because I was hoping to learn about running injury management and how to keep people running healthy. It took years to reach that goal, but I finally made it.

My advice: Stay the course.

BRAD BEER: Great question. My advice would be two-fold:

1. To not ‘look side-ways’. Avoid the comparison game. The grass may appear to be greener but it rarely is!
2. Be patient. Success is developed through the navigation of an array of challenges and various learning opportunities that life both professionally and personally generates.The degree to which you succeed and progresswill be determined by the degree that you stop to evaluate your learnings and lessons.It has been said that experience is an OK teacher but evaluated experience is an even better teacher.

JESSICA MCKINNEY: Study, travel, and read more before you start your family and trust your gut in bridging pelvic health and your orthopedic manual therapy training. You’ll know enough to do it way earlier than you think.

DR. SETH OBERST: Having a reason for everything that we do as physios. Having a paradigm for progression/regression as well as using a test-retest model that exposes the client to the intervention based on your hypothesis and then gauges their response is crucial! It’s what separates the zeros from the heroes. The key is to recognize patterns and that means a lot of deliberate practice. Experience itself does not equate to expertise; deliberate, thoughtful experience while being driven by what we don’t know yields expertise.

Expose yourself to other ideas outside of physio. Yoga, massage therapy, kettlebells, Oly lifting, anything. We try to own these little silos of information without considering other, often very effective, schools of thought. Way too many PTs have no clue about training methods and movements which is rather ridiculous. If you yourself cannot pull, push, press, and squat how the hell can you expect to have face validity when calling yourself a sports physio or trying to coach a patient (and yes everyone should be able to perform those movements in some capacity). Because ultimately PTs are movement coaches so take pride in owning movement.

ANDY LODATO: This profession and your patients will humble you. They will humble you with their generosity, their complexity and their vulnerability. You won’t realize the power that you have to help someone just by listening and talking. The profession is a “Physical Therapist”, but all of those psychology classes you took in undergrad will be of great use to you. Also, remember to be have patience. Your career and development will take not happen overnight. All of the bumps in the road are part of the journey.

ANN WENDEL: I would tell myself that it’s all going to be ok. That no matter what happens, I can turn it around and make a really satisfying life for myself.

JULIE WEIBE: Change is an evolution, not a revolution. Be patient, and stand strong even when you are swimming against the tide.

Never stop learning.

Stop cursing like a sailor.

Stop dating that guy. Wait for the Canadian….(I would sort of trail that last one off into a whisper, then slink back into the shadows….)

Find me on Twitter: @Cinema_Air

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